High-quality child care and early education can build a strong foundation for young children's healthy development and ensure that children have all they need to thrive. This knowledge drives CLASP's work to promote policies that support both child development and the needs of low-income working parents. We support policies that expand resources for child care and early education initiatives at the federal, state, and local levels.  We also study the relationships between child care subsidy systems, Head Start and Early Head Start, state pre-kindergarten programs, and other birth to five early education efforts, to advance ideas that ensure these systems address the full range of needs of children and families. 

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Oct 30, 2014  |  PERMALINK »

2013 Head Start and *New* Early Head Start State Profiles Now Available from CLASP

By Christina Walker and Stephanie Schmit

Each year, CLASP releases state-by-state analyses of the Head Start program. For the first time, CLASP is also releasing state-by-state analyses of Early Head Start programs. 

Head Start and Early Head Start programs provide comprehensive, high-quality early care and education and support services to vulnerable children and families. Each year, all Head Start grantees are required to complete a Program Information Report (PIR). Earlier this year, CLASP released program-level analyses, including: Early Head Start, Head Start preschool, and Migrant/Seasonal Head Start programs. The 2013 Head Start State Profiles include detailed analysis on participants, families, staff, and programs in each state.  

According to the 2013 state profiles for all Head Start programs:

  • In 19 states, Spanish was the primary language for at least 25 percent of participants. California served the highest rate of Spanish-speaking participants (49 percent).
  • At the end of the program year, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island had the highest rates of children with access to a medical home (100 percent). Between the beginning and end of the program year, the District of Columbia had the largest increase in the rate of children gaining access to a medical home (12 percent).
  • At the end of the program year, both Delaware and Massachusetts had the highest rates of children with access to health insurance (100 percent). Between the beginning and end of the program year, the District of Columbia and Illinois had the largest increases in the rate of children gaining access to health insurance (8 percent).
  • At the end of the program year, Georgia, Oregon, Tennessee, and Texas had the highest rates of children with access to a dental home (95 percent). Between the beginning and end of the program year, Rhode Island had the largest increase in the rate of children gaining access to a dental home (23 percent).
  • Delaware and Rhode Island had the highest rates of families receiving access to at least one family support service (96 percent). 

Early Head Start serves children ages zero to three and pregnant women. According to the 2013 Early Head Start State Profiles:

  • California, New Jersey, and Arizona had the highest rates of staff members proficient in at least one other language besides English (59, 56, and 50 percent respectively). However, in 21 states, less than 10 percent of staff was proficient in a language other than English.
  • At the end of the program year, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Rhode Island, and West Virginia had the highest rates of children with access to a medical home (100 percent). Between the beginning and end of the program year, Oklahoma had the largest increase in the rate of children gaining access to a medical home (13 percent).
  • At the end of the program year, Delaware, Louisiana, and Massachusetts had the highest rates of children with access to health insurance (100 percent). Between the beginning and end of the program year, Louisiana, Maine, and Oklahoma had the largest increases in the rate of children gaining access to health insurance (7 percent).
  • At the end of the program year, Texas had the highest rate of children with access to a dental home (90 percent). Between the beginning and end of the program year, New Hampshire had the largest rate of increase of children gaining access to a dental home (30 percent).
  • Eight states provided 100 percent of pregnant women access to prenatal health care: Alabama, Delaware, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Dakota, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Delaware and Rhode Island provided 100 percent of pregnant woman access to insurance.

Visit the 2013 Head Start and Early Head Start state profiles to read more about your state or view the national Head Start and Early Head Start profiles. 

Job Schedules Matter

Three audio conference calls will address job scheduling challenges for low-wage workers, including a November 19th call on Job Schedules: Child Care and Subsides. Job schedules, particularly volatile schedules, can create and exacerbate challenges low-income parents face accessing child care and child care assistance. Sign up for this call or the entire series.

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