Did You Know?

Low wage jobs and child poverty and trending

Low wage jobs and child poverty are trending: the share of poor children with at least one parent working full time year round has grown from one quarter (25.77%) to nearly a third (30.2%) between 1994 and 2012. Learn More »

Wanting to work more

Even before the current recession a greater proportion of workers reported they would prefer to work more (27 percent) rather than fewer (7 percent) hours than they currently work per week. Learn More »

Sick Days

Barely half of all workers has paid sick days to care for themselves, and only one in three have sick days to care for sick children. Learn More »

Low Wage Workers and Sick Days

Only one in four low-wage workers has paid sick days. Learn More »

Sick days and the spread of flu

Paid sick days minimize the spread of the flu, a highly contagious ailment that accounts for 10 to 12 percent of all illness-related work absences. Learn More »

Involuntary part-time work reaches a 30-year high

In 2009, involuntary part-time work has reached a 30-year high, and the length of the average workweek has fallen to a record low 33.3 hours. Learn More »

Rigid Managers Increase Workers' Cardiovascular Risk

Rigid managers increase workers' cardiovascular risk. An NIH study has found that the most rigid managers, those who do not respond to the needs of their workers, double the cardiovascular risks of employees. Learn More »

BLS estimates cost to employers of paid sick days

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that it would cost an employer just 8 cents per hour worked to offer paid sick days to workers in the service industry. Learn More »

Part-time Workers as Primary Wage Earners

Almost half of all part-time workers were primary wage earners in 2009, up from 31 percent in 1969. Learn More »

On average, Americans work 4.8 more weeks per year than workers in other developed nations. In 2007, Americans worked an average of 45.9 weeks of the year. By contrast, the average German worked 41 weeks, and the average Norwegian 36 weeks.

On average, Americans work 4.8 more weeks per year than workers in other developed nations. In 2007, Americans worked an average of 45.9 weeks of the year. By contrast, the average German worked 41 weeks, and the average Norwegian 36 weeks. Learn More »

One in three workers are non-permanent

Contingent, or non-permanent, workers earn less money than permanent employees. More than 30 percent of the workforce in the United States is now contingent, which includes freelancers, part-time workers, independent contractors, agency temps, and others. Learn More »

When Minimum Wage Goes Up, So Does Consumer Spending

When the minimum wage increases, consumer spending increases with it. Paying America's low-wage workers better would help boost the nation's economy. Learn More »

The Family and Medical Leave Act guarantees 12 weeks of unpaid parental leave, and it applies only to workplaces of over 50 employees. While this law was a step in the right direction, the United States is still the only high-income country with no unive

The Family and Medical Leave Act guarantees 12 weeks of unpaid parental leave, and it applies only to workplaces of over 50 employees. While this law was a step in the right direction, the United States is still the only high-income country with no unive Learn More »

There is no national requirement for paternal leave in the U.S

Paid leave benefits for new fathers range from 2 days to 6 weeks among other high-income countries. In the United States, there is no national requirement for paid leave for new fathers. Learn More »

Even though Americans spend 2.5 times more per capita on healthcare then the average Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development country, the U.S. is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not offer universal primary healthcare.

Even though Americans spend 2.5 times more per capita on healthcare then the average Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development country, the U.S. is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not offer universal primary healthcare. Learn More »

American workers are high performing, but their wages no longer reflect it. Between 1979 and 2009, U.S. productivity increased 80 percent, while hourly wages for median workers increased only 10.1 percent.

American workers are high performing, but their wages no longer reflect it. Between 1979 and 2009, U.S. productivity increased 80 percent, while hourly wages for median workers increased only 10.1 percent. Learn More »

Minimum wage in the United States is only 37 percent of the median wage. By contrast, the average among OECD countries is 48 percent.

Minimum wage in the United States is only 37 percent of the median wage. By contrast, the average among OECD countries is 48 percent. Learn More »

The United States is the only developed country with no mandated paid annual leave for employees.

The United States is the only developed country with no mandated paid annual leave for employees. Learn More »

Part time jobs also tend to be low paying jobs

49 percent of food preparation and serving related jobs are part time, as are 34 percent of retail sales jobs, and 43 percent of personal care and service jobs. These jobs also tend to be low-wage jobs. Learn More »

Non-Economic Reasons play into the decision to work part \xe2\x80" time

68 percent of part time workers say their reasons for working part time are "non-economic." The most common reasons are school, family obligations, and retired or social security limit on earnings. Learn More »

Nearly one in five non-voluntary workers were the family bread winner

19 percent of non-voluntary part-time workers ages 18 to 64 are the primary wage earner in their family. Learn More »

Access to earned sick days decreases changes of workplace injury

Workers with earned sick days were 28 percent less likely to experience occupational injuries than those without access to sick days. Learn More »

Many workers have no paid leave at all

Many lower wage workers have no access to any type of paid leave. Almost half of all workers making less than $550/week receive no paid personal leave, sick leave, family leave, or vacation at all. Learn More »
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