Child Care Subsidies

Child care subsidies make quality child care more affordable, support the healthy development of children, and help low-income parents access the child care they need to go to work or to school to support their families. CLASP develops and promotes child care subsidy policies that expand access to assistance for low-income families, improve the quality of child care across settings, and help child care providers access the supports they need to provide high-quality care. We analyze state and national child care subsidy data to help advocates and policymakers better understand state policies and make the case for effective policies. For state child care assistance fact sheets, go to In the States.

Jun 11, 2014  |  PERMALINK »

Senate Subcommittee Increases Federal Early Education Investments

By Hannah Matthews

Yesterday, as part of the 2015 appropriations process, the U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies marked up a bill that includes more than $348 million in new funding for child care and early education programs. The Subcommittee approved:

  • A $145 million increase for Head Start, including $80 million for a cost-of-living increase for existing grantees and $65 million for Early Head Start, including funding for Early Head Start – Child Care Partnership grants.
  • A $100 million increase for the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) to help states improve quality while maintaining access for low-income families.
  • A $100 million increase for Preschool Development Grants to help states initiate or implement high-quality preschool programs for low-income families. 
  • And a $3.3 million increase for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part C for services for infants and toddlers and their families.

This significant investment in the context of a very tight budget shows once again that many federal policymakers understand the critical importance of investing in our youngest children. The full Senate Appropriations committee is expected to take up the bill later this week. The House has not yet released a companion spending bill.

Read a summary of the Subcommittee bill>>

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