Education and training are drivers of economic mobility and opportunity. CLASP works to strengthen federal and state education and training policy to ensure that low-wage workers and low-income individuals can enter and advance in the labor market, and to make sure that American businesses have access to workers with skills they need to compete. Transitional jobs, career exploration, job placement, and access to work supports such as child care also are essential for helping individuals get better jobs, succeed in education and training, and advance along a career pathway.

CLASP also develops and advocates for policies that connect individuals with low basic skills to postsecondary education and jobs that pay family-sustaining wages. Learn more about our Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success (C-PES) initiative.

Nov 6, 2015  |  PERMALINK »

In the Spotlight: CLASP’s Career Pathway Framework Highlighted in New Brief

By Manuela Ekowo

Last month, the College and Career Readiness and Success (CCRS) Center at the American Institutes for Research (AIR) released a new brief, Career Pathways Initiatives.  A career pathway system is the cohesive combination of partnerships, resources and funding, policies, data, and shared performance measures that support the development, quality, scaling, and “dynamic sustainability” of career pathways and programs. Career pathways reorient existing education and workforce services from myriad disconnected programs into a structure that syncs employers' workforce needs with individuals' education and training needs.

CCRS’s brief highlights major national and regional career pathways initiatives and offers ideas for states on designing and implementing career pathways. CLASP’s Alliance for Quality Career Pathways (AQCP) framework, designed for community colleges and their partners, is among the frameworks highlighted. 

Members also raised questions about how to target programs to participants who were unlikely to be hired otherwise. Bloom explained that many programs are targeted to individuals with significant barriers to employment, such as criminal records or long-term unemployment.  He also noted that many programs provide job search assistance to recipients to try to connect them to unsubsidized jobs prior to considering them for subsidized placements. 

Subsidized employment is a valuable way to help disadvantaged adult and youth workers develop work skills and experience while earning money to support themselves and their families. It can be an important component of a TANF work program. President Obama’s FY 2015 budget proposal had several provisions to support subsidized employment, including a recommendation to shift $600 million from the TANF Contingency Fund to a new Pathways to Jobs program, which would support state-subsidized employment programs for low-income individuals.  The positive atmosphere at this hearing suggests potential for future bipartisan efforts to support subsidized jobs programs.  When debating further investment into these programs, Congress should listen to Sandra Collins: “They make a difference and I am living proof of it!”

READ MORE >>
site by Trilogy Interactive