Elementary and Secondary Education Act

CLASP works on issues in the implementation and improvement of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA, or the No Child Left Behind Act, NCLB) that impact low-income families and their children. Our goal is to support state and local activities that expand high-quality services to children often left out of educational programs, including young children below the age of school entry and older youth who may be struggling students or disconnected from school. CLASP tracks and analyzes available data, highlights innovative program models and systemic changes that better support low-income children and youth, and makes recommendations for the implementation of ESEA and for the pending reauthorization of the program.

Resources & Publications

MAR 26, 2010 I RHONDA TSOI-A-FATT
Reauthorizing ESEA: Considerations for Dropout Prevention and Recovery

American school districts are losing the battle to successfully educate a large number of the nation's youth. The reauthorization of ESEA is a prime opportunity to rethink how we can strengthen our commitment to reconnect with youth who have left school without receiving their diploma. These comments, submitted to the US House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor, focus on how to amend ESEA to ensure that struggling students and high school dropouts have access to systems, support, and funding to remain in school or re-enter the educational system and attain a viable education that prepares them for post secondary opportunities and success in careers.

Testimony of Danielle Ewen for U.S. Department of Education ESEA Listening Tour
Danielle Ewen's testimony lays out principles to consider for early childhood issues in the upcoming reauthorization of ESEA and CLASP's recommendations for changes to the law. 

JAN 21, 2010 i HANNAH MATTHEWS AND DANIELLE EWEN
FAQ: Using Title I of ESEA for Early Education

This paper provides answers to frequently asked questions on using Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act funds on early education. 

JUN 1, 2009 I HANNAH MATTHEWS AND DANIELLE EWEN
Title I and Early Education: Models for Using ARRA Funds

This page provides provides information on how Title I can be used for early education, the benefits of using Title I, and illustrative examples of school districts that have used Title I funds to invest in services from infant/toddler programs to pre-kindergarten classes to Head Start collaboration.

 JUL 7, 2008 I RHONDA TSOI-A-FATT AND JONATHAN LARSEN
Comments/Recommendations in response to Department of Education Proposed NCLB Rules in Federal Register Document E8-8700

Adaptations to No Child Left Behind provide an opportunity to strengthen our nation’s educational structure and system of services to better educate struggling students and to re-engage youth who have dropped out. Our comments relate specifically to giving increased attention to struggling students and disconnected youth. Local education agencies can be incentivized to pay closer attention to these populations through increasing the graduation rate requirements, and Supplemental Education Services and public school choice are potential vehicles for providing these students with the educational environments and supports to increase their academic success.

OCT 5, 2007 I DANIELLE EWEN AND HANNAH MATTHEWS
Title I and Early Childhood Programs: A Look at Investments in the NCLB Era

This paper explores the wide range of ways in which school districts are using funds from Title I of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) for early education through kindergarten and examines how the implementation of NCLB has impacted those investments. It also makes recommendations for local educational agencies interested in creating Title I-funded early education programs or thinking about how to sustain these types of investments in the face of policy and funding challenges.

SEP 11, 2007 I RHONDA TSOI-A-FATT, LINDA HARRIS, MALA THAKUR, AND JONATHAN LARSEN 
Recommendations to Improve No Child Left Behind for Struggling Students and Disconnected Youth

Every day, an estimated 2,500 students across the nation drop out of high school. While the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) has succeeded in bringing to light the disparities that exist in our education system, it has failed to shine a light and provide solutions to the pressing problem of high school dropouts. These recommendations--by CLASP and the National Youth Employment Coalition--focus on how the resources in NCLB can be used to ensure that these youth have access to systems, support, and funding to attain a viable education that prepares them for future learning opportunities and the world of work.

JUL 20, 2007 I Linda Harris and Rhonda Tsoi-A-Fatt
Recommended Changes to the No Child Left Behind Act to Address Workforce Issues  
CLASP recommendations submitted to the House Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness of the Committee on Education and Labor.

MAY 17, 2007 I Danielle Ewen and Hannah Matthews
Recommendations to Support High-quality Early Education Programs Through Reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act

Unlike other early care and education funding sources, Title I of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) has seen some increases in funding levels since 2002. As a result, a number of policymakers interested in investing in high-quality early care and education programs have turned to Title I as a funding source. This publication, which draws from two years study of the relationship between Title I and high-quality early education, offers recommendations for the reauthorization of NCLB.  

MAR 30, 2005 I DANIELLE EWEN, JENNIFER MEZEY, AND HANNAH MATTHEWS
Missed Opportunities: The Possibilities and Challenges of Funding High-quality Preschool through Title I of the No Child Left Behind Act

This paper, funded by the Foundation for Child Development, provides general background on the legislation behind Title I and provides an overview of the available data on the use of Title I funds for preschool, as well as illustrative examples of how a few states and local communities have used Title I funds for these programs. It also examines the U.S. Department of Education’s statutes, regulations, and guidance on the use of Title I funds for preschool and raises some unanswered questions. Finally, it discusses how the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act may affect the availability of Title I funding for preschool programs.

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